2019 City of Colorado Springs Candidates
  • Voters may select one mayoral candidate and up to three at-large city council candidates.
  • Candidates are listed in the order they appear on the ballot.
  • Responses were not edited for grammar, punctuation, or spelling.
At-Large City Council Candidates

Gordon Klingenschmitt

Bill Murray

Val Snider

Wayne Williams

  • What are the top two issues facing Colorado Springs and how will you address them?

    1. Protecting our city’s economic vitality, which includes both jobs and housing as well as ensuring parks, police, fire protection, and utility services for a growing community by prioritizing these needs. 2. Addressing the city’s infrastructure needs, particularly in transportation and utilities.  As a commissioner and PPACG officer, I successfully worked to obtain environmental clearance (to 4 lanes) and funding for widening I-25 to 3 lanes.  I will work to gain the funding for a 4th lane which will reduce congestion and improve air quality. We should build the necessary generation and transmission infrastructure to replace Drake.

  • How would you engage greater citizen input from underrepresented or disengaged communities and increase their public access to government information and decision-making? 

    By making information easily accessible online and at libraries so that there is no need to visit a city office.  As a commissioner, I put the county’s budget online and expanded online services both as clerk and as secretary of state.  I also try to be personally accessible to everyone by publishing my personal cell phone (439-1870) and to attend and participate in events across the city.

  • The 2018 point in time survey found over 1500 people experiencing homelessness in our community. What measures could elected leaders take to reduce homelessness and poverty? 

    We should encourage job growth and training for new jobs, which I did working with the Pikes Peak Workforce Center and serving on the Reach Pikes Peak Board. I worked on the Colorado Springs Housing Authority Board with Dick Sullivan (who added 5,400 homes) for a decade to add affordable housing, using both public-private and public-public partnerships.  I want to revitalize the Housing Authority’s efforts and also seek to reduce regulations that limit private construction of affordable housing.  I support addition of sufficient low barrier shelter beds, removing other barriers to housing, and implementing the City’s 2019 Homelessness Initiative. 

  • In your view, how can public transit and infrastructure best serve a growing population?

    I worked with many partners to establish the Pikes Peak RTA which provides more than $10 million a year to support Mountain Metro Transit.  When we placed the RTA in front of voters, the City assured voters it would maintain its $5.7 million annual funding.  The City should fulfil that promise each year.  We should encourage higher density development along bus lines that support both necessity and choice riders.  We also need to support regional transit as well—as Secretary of State I opened up Bustang passes to our El Paso County employees and I commuted by bus frequently. 

  • What steps should the City of Colorado Springs take to ensure economic development, while ensuring that residents do not lose access to affordable housing and other services?

    We need to keep taxes low and provide a safe community while ensuring our infrastructure and services keep pace with growth.  During the decade I served on the Colorado Springs Housing Authority we developed innovative private and public partnerships to increase the inventory of affordable housing, including building Creekside at Norwood with Peterson Air Force Base.  We need to work to revitalize the Housing Authority’s efforts, increase these partnerships, and support others in the community seeking to create affordable housing.  We also should seek to reduce regulations that limit private construction of affordable housing.

  • How does Council ensure that Colorado Springs best serves the interests of an increasingly diverse population, whether age, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or lifestyle? 

    First by being accessible to everyone.  Every citizen and every taxpayer should have a say in city government.  I try to be accessible to everyone by publishing my personal cell phone (439-1870).  I was the only state official to do that and I will continue that as a member of city council. Second by working to fulfill Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream that city employment and other decisions are based on “the content of their character.” Council also should seek opportunities to attend diverse events across our community. 

  • How do you ensure that freedom of religious expression in government affairs respects the diversity of faith traditions in our community? 

    Our city is home to many wonderful nonprofits, congregations, and individuals of many different faiths and traditions.  We should welcome this diversity--as one religious leader said, “let them worship how, where, or what they may.” Government should be welcoming and open to working with everyone.  Many of our religious nonprofits (like Catholic Charities and the Salvation Army) play key roles in tackling our community’s important issues, like homelessness, and providing critical services.  We also should welcome the input of people of diverse faiths at Council meetings and on city boards. 

  • What role does a vibrant and well-funded arts and cultural sector play in the overall vitality of our local economy?

    Colorado Springs is a great place to live and visit because of our unique combination of natural beauty and the arts and culture opportunities we provide.  As a commissioner I worked with nonprofits to improve the Pikes Peak Center and the Norris Penrose Equestrian Center, worked within the county to support our nature centers and the county fair, and worked with the community to expand recreation and cultural opportunities.  We should work to support our new Olympic Museum and other events and venues in the arts and culture sector.

  • Contact Information

    waynewilliamslaw@comcast.net    winwithwayne.org and www.facebook.com/WayneWilliamsforColorado/  439-1870  B.A., Political Science, BYU;  J.D., University of Virginia; Harry S Truman Scholar  Attorney and Elections Consultant 

Tony Gioia

Terry Martinez

Regina English

Tom Strand

  • What are the top two issues facing Colorado Springs and how will you address them? 

    Improving public safety and 2) Addressing an increasing need to provide resources  for the homeless population.  The increase in fatal traffic accidents and violent homicides demand immediate action by adding 120 police officers in the next 2 years.  We do this by ramping recruiting and police academy training and ensuring compensation and benefits match other large cities.  We need a full Hazmat fire group rather than a multi-station pick up team.   The new  six-point  Homeless  Plan that I helped to create  is action n oriented  and  focuses on assisting families  first,   job  training, mental health and substance abuse counseling.

  • How would you engage greater citizen input from underrepresented or disengaged communities and increase their public access to government information and decision-making? 

    As the Utilities Board  Chair, we  seek  citizen/rate payer input from our underrepresented and disengaged people by getting  into those  neighborhood s and informing the citizens about Project COPE (utility subsidy payment) and teaching them about utility conservation and smart use programs.  As such, using Town Halls throughout the six city districts and with word of mouth and social media as well as print and tv/radio to invite these communities to participate in the 55 local government boards and commissions and committees and to become personally involved in resolution and  ordinance  decision making. 

  • The 2018 point in time survey found over 1500 people experiencing homelessness in our community. What measures could elected leaders take to reduce homelessness and poverty?

    This question directly refers to one of my top issues in question #1.  The 2019 Point in Time Survey found even more than 1500 individuals facing the harshness and heartbreak of homelessness.  Elected leaders at the State, County and City levels must work together with greater focus  partnering  with non-profits, faith-based and the private business sector to address and provide resources for poverty, workforce training, substance abuse counseling and mental health care.  We do this one family and homeless person at a time, harnessing the El Paso County Work Force Center, the Public Health Department, our medical institutions and entrepreneurial leaders.  

  • In your view, how can public transit and infrastructure best serve a growing population? 

    During my  four  years  on City Council and the CSU Board, we have made great progress in improving public transit (buses) and infrastructure to increase quality and reliability of transportation and roads, bridges, wastewater, water and utility access and transmission.  We passed ordinances like 2C (road repair) and 2A (stormwater mitigation) to provide fiscal ability to fix roads, repair potholes and comply with ADA requirements.  By building the Southern Delivery System from the Pueblo  Reservoir, we assured water supply as our city grows beyond 500,000 people for at least three decades.  These  actions  received  National  awards.

  • What steps should the City of Colorado Springs take to ensure economic development, while ensuring that residents do not lose access to affordable housing and other services? 

    Increasing economic development for local and new businesses while incentivizing and encouraging affordable housing and reasonable cost of living and utility rates must be our primary goal and demand total city government attention and delivery.  We accomplish this  balance by relying on our City Economic Development Office and Chamber of Commerce to attract, market and recruit current companies and industry to expand and grow and  find  new businesses  to relocate or begin new entrepreneurial  opportunities.  W e ensure utilities rates are  low  and provide economic incentives and opportunities with our Regional Building Department and City Planning Department for home builders and developers.

  • How does Council ensure that Colorado Springs best serves the interests of an increasingly diverse population, whether age, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or lifestyle?

    Our City Council, with my participation, passed the first City Master Plan – Plan COS,  in the last 10 years.  This Master Plan  Ordinance insures that  all City Planning and City Government activities focus on our diverse peoples, including  those identified above.   I voted for our newest  Commission on  Aging, (it is interesting to note that the average age in our city is 36 years).   City Council guarantees that our  total population  interests  are preserved, protected and considered in every  Ordinance and  Resolution passed by the legislative branch of City Government. 

  • How do you ensure that freedom of religious expression in government affairs respects the diversity of faith traditions in our community?

    Freedom of religious belief and expression is not only guaranteed in our U.S. Constitution, but stressed in our City Charter and  Code.  Before every  regular City Council meeting, we begin  with  an invocation and prayer.  These moments of reflection have been presented by Christian ministers, Jewish rabbis, Muslim clerics, non-denominational religious pastors, and agnostic  believers and atheists.  In 2019, as the Chairman of the Colorado Springs Utilities Board of Directors, I initiated meeting invocations  and prayers  at the start of each monthly  Board meeting.  During both City Council and Utilities Board meetings, we respect and honor all religious expression. 

  • What role does a vibrant and well-funded arts and cultural sector play in the overall vitality of our local economy?

    As the City Council  liaison  to the Pikes Peak Arts  Commission,  and working directly with  our  Pioneer’s museum, I am committed to supporting and finding the funding and  people  energy to ensure that Colorado Springs sustains  and supports a vibrant and appropriately funded arts and cultural industry.  I also serve as the City Council liaison to the LART (Lodging and Rental Car Tax) Committee where the board members have approved funding for the Copper Arts non-profit organization as well as financial support for the Summit House on top of America’s Mountain, and the Olympic Museum and Hall of Fame. 

  • Contact Information

    tomstrand19@yahoo.com standwithstrandcos.com  719-210-1607 Juris Doctorate (Law), B.A. Business Administration Retired USAF, City Councilmember, CSU Board Member (Chair) 

Randy Tuck

Athena Roe

Dennis Spiker